Public Profile Database

Alissa Trotz
Category / Expertise:
Title: Professor
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Professor Alissa Trotz teaches at the University of Toronto, where she is cross-appointed between Caribbean Studies Programme at New College and Women and Gender Studies (WGSI),  Following a year of law school in the Caribbean, she completed her undergraduate degree in Political Science and Latin American and Caribbean studies at York University, her Master of Philosophy and PhD at Trinity College, University of Cambridge.

Dr. Trotz has received the Award for the Distinguished Contribution to Graduate Teaching at OISE (2007), the SAC-APUS Undergraduate teaching Award (2007) and the Faculty of Arts and Science Outstanding Teaching Award (2010).

Amah Beryl T. Harris,
Category / Expertise:
Title: Actress
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Amah Harris, B.A. B.ED., MEd. , Dominican born, is most often identified as an anti-racist advocate, innovative educator, and champion of culture, who fosters the Harmonious Coexistence of Peoples. Amah knitted education and theatre techniques into a fabric of cooperative action, using elements of culture. This process evolved into education and theatre modules and techniques, which allow participants, whether students or performers, children, youth or adults, to actively engage with information, script development and performance.

“Amah is a pioneer in the field of Black Theatre in Canada,” said John Holland Awards co-chair, Evelyn Myrie (Hamilton Spectator 2014). She co-directed Black Theatre Canada (BTC) in the 70s and was contracted by them in the 80s. Her innovative experimentation had its first major forum at BTC. This experimentation reached its peak at Theatre In The Rough; a theatre founded by Amah in 1985. It was at BTC that she became a writer ‘out of need’. She explained, “Plays addressing the reality of the Caribbean and Black Experience in Canada seemed practically non-existent.” Out of this need her, “Kwakoo Anansi Series” was born. She adapted the traditional African figure into a ‘selfless’ problem solver leading progressive change, while retaining his cunning, fun filled personality. He uses wisdom, not violence, to solve problems.

Amal Madibbo
Category / Expertise:
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Dr. Amal Madibbo was born in Sudan where she grew up and was schooled. She started her university education in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Khartoum in Sudan and completed it at l’Université Lumière Lyon 2, Lyon, in France with a specialization in French Language and Literature. She then immigrated to Canada where she became the first Sudanese woman to immigrate on her own and continued her education. She obtained a Master of Arts from Carleton University in Ottawa with a specialization in French Sociolinguistics and Black Francophone literature. She graduated with a PhD in 2004 from the Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education (SESE) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) of the University of Toronto where she specialized in Black Francophone immigration to and in Canada and race and anti-racism. Upon graduation, she lectured at SESE/OISE and Glendon College at Glendon College of York University in Toronto. She then joined the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary in 2007 where she is now Associate Professor.

Dr. Madibbo has made significant achievements in research as she has conducted studies in Canada, Sudan, France, Mali, Senegal, Chad and Rwanda in the areas of immigration, race and ethnicity, conflict and conflict resolution, and identity. To date, her research resulted in a book about Francophone immigration in Canada published by Routledge; an edited book about the relations between Canada and Sudan published by McGill-Queen University Press; over 30 articles, book chapters and other publications; and 46 papers delivered at national and international conferences. In addition, she integrates her research in her teaching, which results in teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of immigration, globalization, and racial and ethnic relations. She also supervises students studying related issues.  

Amoye Shiyanne Henry
Category / Expertise:
Title: Business Development Manager
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Amoye Henry born of Caribbean parents in Kingston, Jamaica and migrated to Canada with her family. She was raised in Rexdale/Brampton, Ontario but now lives in Toronto. Amoye went to Etobicoke School of the arts specializing in Music Theory and Music Performance and is a classically trained (but not practicing) violinist and pianist. Later, she diverted from the artistic realm and was successful in obtaining a B.Sc in Political Science with a concentration in Communications at McMaster University in 2010. Amoye organically gravitates towards initiatives that focus on the advancement of women and children, globally. She has cultivated an interest in eventually pursuing the MBA, an academic program she believes would serve her launching pad for her aspirations in Healthcare Administration and Systems Management.

Andrea A Davis
Category / Expertise:
Title: Professor
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Dr. Andrea A. Davis is a Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Chair of the Department of Humanities at York University in Toronto, Canada. She holds cross-appointments in the graduate programs in English; Interdisciplinary Studies; and Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies. She is former Director of the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC), a current research fellow of the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on Africa and its Diasporas, and a member of the Committee of Associates of the Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora. She also sits on the Board of the Legal Aid Ontario’s Racialized Communities Advisory Committee.

Professor Davis’s research interests are in the intersections of the literatures and cultures of the Black diasporas in the Caribbean, the United States, and Canada. Her work encourages an intertextual cross-cultural dialogue about Black people’s experiences in diaspora

Angela Clarke
Category / Expertise:
Title: Designer
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Angela Yvonne Clarke - has enormous talents and skills and loves to share with her community. She migrated to Canada in 1969, from the beautiful sunshine Island of Trinidad and Tobago, leaving a young daughter and a successful modeling career. In Canada, there were many opportunities from which to choose, so with purpose and drive, Angela decided to focus on continuing her education. To that end, she attended George Brown College, Seneca College and Marvel Beauty school. She accomplished all this, while working at Simpson’s Department Store. Her drive for success helped her to obtain Diplomas and Certificates in courses such as, Pattern Design, Drafting, Sewing, Tailoring, Bridal Design, Hair Design, Cosmetology and Floral Design. She continued learning through every and any opportunity that came her way.  She advanced very quickly to realizing her dream and subsequently sent for her daughter in Trinidad.

Angela James
Category / Expertise:
Title: Athlete
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Angela was a resident in Flemingdon Park from 1966 – 1981 with her two sisters Kim, Cindee and Mother Donna. She played Ice Hockey for the Flemingdon Boys House League and other select teams for two or three seasons.  Angela also played Softball for the local team in the area. She attended Gateway public school in JK and SK and then transferred to John XXIII Catholic School. Once she finished grade 6, Angela attended Valley Park Jr. High School and then crossed the street to, at the time, the Overlea Secondary School.  Her Mother moved the family to Georges Vanier high school, when Angela was starting grade 10.

Ms. James was a member of the Canadian Women’s Hockey team for 10 years, winning a remarkable four World Gold Medal Championships and four International Pacific Rim Championships. In addition, she was a member of the 1992 and 1994 Canadian Women’s Roller Hockey Team, which won gold at the World Championships. In a controversial decision, Ms. James was excluded from Team Canada’s Women’s Team for the 1998 Winter Olympics.  Pundits were shocked because, from 1987 until that time, she had been Canada’s perennial scoring threat, no matter where and when played. She is an honoured member of the Seneca College Hall of Fame, the Ball Hockey hall of fame and the OCAA Hall of Fame, a Seneca Distinguished Alumnist and has had her sweater retired by Seneca College and the Toronto Aeros Hockey Club. In 2012, she was the recipient of the YWCA women’s distinguished award. In three seasons with the Scouts, Angela was a three-time OCAA scoring champion, two-time OCAA All-Star, three-time team MVP, the OCAA’s all-time leading scorer with over fifty goals and amazingly reached this mark while playing mostly defense. In 2008, she was one of the first female in history, to be inducted into the International Ice Hockey Hall of Fame (IIHF). Also the Angela James Bowl was instituted, awarded annually to the leading scorer in the Canadian Women’s Hockey League (CWHL). She was inducted into the Canada’s Sports Hall of fame and the Flemingdon Park Arena was renamed after her. In 2010, Angela along with fellow American, Cammie Granato was the first female to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Angela James was dubbed the “Wayne Gretzky of women’s hockey”.

Angela Simmonds
Category / Expertise:
Title: Manager, Equity & Access
Achievements & Accomplishments:

 Angela Simmonds is the daughter of the late Junior Sparks and Joanne.  She is from Cherry Brook, Nova Scotia and resides in North Preston.

Angela is a graduate of Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University. She is the Managing Lawyer of the Equity & Access Office at the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society, where she is responsible for managing initiatives that promote cultural competence, equity, diversity and inclusion addressing access to justice.

Angela has been able to use her legal knowledge, community background and grass roots approach to address racial inequities; anti-black racism, gender and socio-economic inequities; discriminatory policies and practices within this province.  Angela travelled to the United Nations, and presented recommendations about justice, housing, land title, education and recognition for African Nova Scotian people and communities. For

Anne Cools
Category / Expertise:
Title: Politician
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Senator Anne Clare Cools is an Ontario Senator representing Toronto-Centre-York. She was summoned to the Senate in January 1984 by His Excellency Governor General Edward Schreyer on the recommendation of the Rt. Hon. Pierre Trudeau. She is the first black person appointed to the Senate of Canada and is the first black female senator in North America. Born August 12, 1943 in Barbados, British West Indies, and grew up in a household that valued education and political service. At the age of thirteen she move at to Montreal with her family.  Senator Cools was educated at Queen’s College Girls School, Barbados; Thomas D’Arcy McGee High School, Montreal; and Montreal’s McGill University, from which she holds a Bachelor of Arts. In the 1979 and 1980 federal general elections, Anne Cools was a candidate with Trudeau’s Liberals in Toronto’s Rosedale riding. In June 2004, after 20 years as a Liberal Senator, she joined the Conservatives for a short time. Currently, Senator Cools sits as an Independent Senator, she has no party affiliation.  Senator Cools is deeply committed to the constitutional system of responsible government. She is a student of history and parliament, a diligent reader and known for her focused approach to the study of legislation and parliament.  Prior to the Senate, Senator Cools was a social worker in innovative social services in Toronto. In 1974, as a pioneer in domestic and family violence, she founded one of Canada’s first women’s shelters, Women in Transition Inc., serving as its Executive Director. She assisted with the establishment of several other women’s shelters in Ontario. She co-organized Canada’s first domestic violence conference, Couples in Conflict. She presents the evidence that men and women are equally capable of good and bad, and that violence and aggression are not gendered characteristics, but are human ones, and often are a pathology of intimacy.

Annette Bailey
Category / Expertise:
Title: Professor
Achievements & Accomplishments:

Dr. Bailey is currently conducting research to unearth the debilitating grief and trauma impact on Black youth coping with their educational pursuits. In 2015, she established a scholarship programme in the Jane and Finch community, as part of her continuing commitment to reduce youth involvement in violence, and to support their educational endeavours. Since then several scholarships have been awarded primarily to Black youth.